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A Day in the Life: Unveiling the Daily Routine of an Artist

As a naturally inquisitive and creatively-driven individual, I'm excited to dive into this blog post, where I'll walk you through some of my daily objectives and the challenges that often make an appearance. What I'd like to emphasize is my choice in how to respond to these hurdles, rather than letting them dictate my actions.


At times, I find myself ensnared in the clutches of overwhelming tasks, uncertain of where to begin. This scenario often leads to the infamous duo of planning and procrastination, followed by the inevitable companion, stress. On the flip side, there are moments when a nagging voice from the heavens questions my creative endeavors. Instead of succumbing to an emotional reaction, I've learned the art of recognizing this voice as the notorious "mean Mr. Censor." The true magic, however, lies in my ability to tune him out and continue forging ahead. The challenge, as I'll discuss, is consistently remembering to do so.

"Honestly, I try not to do anything I don’t want to do." Keanu Reeves


In the intricate dance of life, I often find myself at crossroads where doubts creep in, and I contemplate my existence in this vast physical universe. In these moments, I've come to realize that I have a choice. There are times when a break, a time-out, is what I genuinely need, and there's nothing wrong with that. However, there's another state I occasionally find myself in: a frozen state, waiting for the elusive inspiration laser to strike. When minutes turn into anxious hours, and I'm left in a state of worry, the fun is nowhere to be found.


I am currently re-reading & working through these 4 books


Experience has taught me that simply sitting and waiting or attempting to mentally solve the puzzle tends to take me on a disheartening merry-go-round. Not only does it leave my precious time slipping through the hourglass, but it also renders me unproductive. To break free from this cycle, I've discovered a simple yet effective remedy that works for me: I keep moving, and I mean this both mentally and physically. This small shift has often proven to be a game-changer in navigating the intricacies of existence.





When I find myself in the clutches of a creative standstill, I've learned the importance of taking proactive measures. In those moments, I have a roster of go-to activities that help me shake off the stagnation. I might wander around my house, step outside for a refreshing walk, indulge in a reset shower, or share some quality playtime with my feline companion, Skills. Engaging in mundane yet purposeful tasks like doing the dishes or cleaning my paintbrushes can be surprisingly effective. The key is to keep moving, both physically and mentally, to prevent being ensnared in a negative thought loop.

I sometimes fall into the trap of doing what I think I should be doing rather than what I want to be doing. Björk


One strategy that has proven to be a lifesaver is granting myself permission to switch to a Plan B activity. As I mentioned earlier, I have a collection of such activities that I jot down on sticky notes and place strategically around my workspace. This method not only streamlines the process but also ensures that I don't waste precious time searching for ideas. With a limit of 2 or 3 sticky notes in my immediate workspace, the messages to myself or lists evolve over time.

Recently, I've found myself immersed in painting multiple times a day, and I've even embraced those moments when the paint is drying as an opportunity to wield a pen and sketch in my notebooks. It's all part of my ever-evolving creative journey, filled with adaptations and strategies to keep the inspiration flowing.



Facing the blank canvas of my creative mind, there are times when I'm at a loss for what to draw. In such moments, I often turn to the simple act of drawing circles. It's a practice that soothes my soul, fine-tunes my artistic skills, and occasionally, from the midst of those circles, an image emerges. This is what I call "discovery drawing" or "free drawing," a form of improvisation where my hand moves before my brain can conjure a specific image. It's akin to the concept of daily pages, where I put pen to paper and let it flow for three uninterrupted pages.

In both cases, there's a framework to the creative exercise, providing a starting point, yet there's no pressure to craft something with a predetermined outcome. It's not about the final product; it's about the journey and the artistic benefits reaped along the way. To further enhance this process, I also pay close attention to my auditory environment, whether it's the melody of music, the engaging narrative of a podcast interview, the exploration of a documentary, or sometimes, the serene embrace of silence. Each element contributes to the unique tapestry of my creative exploration.


5 Improvisational Drawing Benefits:


1. It alleviates the pressure to produce a predetermined end product.

2. There exists a loose structure, providing a starting point for the creative journey.

3. Consistent practice enhances and refines artistic skills.

4. It serves as a relaxation technique, effectively lowering stress levels.

5. On occasions, serendipity graces the canvas, surprising us with the emergence of intriguing and unexpected images.




"And when nobody wakes you up in the morning, and when nobody waits for you at night, and when you can do whatever you want. What do you call it, freedom or loneliness? " Charles Bukowski

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